IMG_9699.png

UMAN

TIMEOUT

Born in Somalia and raised in Kenya, Uman landed in the U.S. via Denmark in 2004, and has since settled in upstate New York. As pleasant as those surroundings must be, it’s unlikely that they can match the majestic African landscape of Uman’s memory—or at least, you can surmise as much from her gallery debut. Paintings of leopard spot patterns and monochromatic profiles of camels are joined by a silhouetted self-portrait and a padded black-vinyl chair scrawled with the message, “I will sit here and wait for you” in white. It all resounds with the plaintive sense of loss familiar to exiles. [READ MORE]


uman-6003.jpg

UMAN

THE NEW YORK TIMES

The multimedia artist Uman made a splash on the New York scene when she had her first solo show at White Columns in September 2015, followed quickly — maybe a little too quickly — by a second show three months later at Louis B. James on the Lower East Side. Her third show, “I Will Sit Here and Wait for You,” at Fierman, overseen by David Fierman, a former partner at James, is smaller than its predecessors — four paintings and two sculptures. But it serves to keep in sight a truly gifted self-taught artist who was born in Somalia, raised in Kenya and came to the United States in 2004. [READ MORE]


Brache-Garden-ZacharyBalber-LocustP.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

CUBAN ART NEWS, CUBAN ROOTS: 6 ARTISTS TO WATCH

Cristine Brache. Born in Miami, of Cuban and Puerto Rican descent, Brache currently lives in Toronto. But she was an active presence in Miami earlier this year with Cristine’s Secret Garden (2019), an installation at Locust Projects. A dreamlike re-envisioning of her childhood home and its front yard, the work also takes inspiration from the Santería shrines on her neighbors’ lawns—“a unique facet of Miami’s cultural landscape,” as Brache put it. [READ MORE]


Screen Shot 2019-07-23 at 2.05.04 PM.png

YENI MAO

THE WASTELAND, NICELLE BEAUCHENE GALLERY, CURATED BY MIKA HARDING

Nicelle Beauchene is pleased to present The Waste Land, a group exhibition including the works of Andrés Bedoya, Bea Fremderman, Saskia Krafft, Yeni Mao, James Miller, Marianne Vitale, and Celeste Wilson. The exhibition takes its name from the poem by T.S. Eliot. He published The Waste Land shortly after the end of World War I—empire was in decline, millions of soldiers and civilians were dead from the War, the populace was fractured by violence and disillusioned by rapidly shifting cultural and political landscapes. The poem’s second stanza focuses on the ecological effects of war, portraying a world where only shadows and dust are left behind. [READ MORE]


660.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

IT WILL NEVER BE QUITE FAMILIAR TO YOU AT OOLITE ARTS MIAMI

It will never become quite familiar to you is a group exhibition that explores notions of heritage and cultural identity through the works of eight artists who have ties to the United States and the global south. The exhibition aims to mine the personal histories, connections, and relationships that each artist has with their respective nationalities in order to gain a broader understanding of home, ethnic identity, and the immigrant experience. [READ MORE]


unnamed+(1).jpg

DOMINIC NURRE

THE NEW YORKER

A conceptual portrait—dispassionate yet deeply personal—emerges in this taut installation, a view of the artist’s late father as a self-absorbed son, a gun enthusiast, and a white-collar criminal. In tone, Nurre’s piece suggests a cool counterpart to Louise Bourgeois’s room-filling cri de coeur  “The Destruction of the Father,”  from 1974, with the key difference being that Nurre’s materials are all ready-made. [READ MORE]


plastiglomerates-kelly-jazvic_dezeen_2364_col_1.jpg

KELLY JAZVAC

MILAN TRIENNALE

Chunks of "plastiglomerate" found by Canadian artist Kelly Jazvac on a Hawaiian beach form part of this year's Milan Triennale exhibition, illustrating how the anthropocene era is leading to the formation of new man-made minerals. The hybrid material is the result of plastic items washed up on the shore fusing with shells, sand and other natural materials when burnt in campfires lit on the beach. The ready-made artworks are presented as a marker of the anthropocene, a proposed new geological era where human impact has become the dominant force on the earth's geology. "The heavier fragments could potentially be preserved in the sediment record, leaving a permanent human-made mark in the Earth's stratiography," reads the exhibition text, which describes the objects as "fossils of the future". "I think it is important to show them because of the warning signs they indicate and the curiosity they generate," Jazvac told Dezeen. "I find them beautiful and horrific at the same time. "The objects are on display as part of Broken Nature: Design Takes On Human Survival, the exhibition that forms the XXII International Exhibition of La Triennale di Milano in Milan, Italy. [READ MORE]


Screen Shot 2019-04-08 at 9.15.27 AM.png

AARON SKOLNICK IN “THE HOT SEAT”

KMAC MUSEUM

A chair is a customary offering within our shared codes of polite behavior. For designers, it is a primary object for interpreting the intersection of function and aesthetics. In contemporary artistic practice it has become an indelible focus of creative inquiry for artists, working in a variety of media, who employ the chair for its ability to embody space, status, personal identity, memory, family history, and other aspects of our humanity. With arms, legs, a seat and a back, the chair can become a surrogate for the human body, reflecting the essence of a person and the lived experience.  [READ MORE]


Screen Shot 2019-04-08 at 9.12.28 AM.png

JIMMY WRIGHT WITH RACHEL HARRISON AND ALBERT OEHLEN

CORBETT VS. DEMPSEY

Opening Reception Friday, April 5, 6 to 8pm Exhibition, April 5 - June 22 In the North Gallery, CvsD is pleased to present a three-person show of works by Rachel Harrison, Albert Oehlen, and Jimmy Wright. The drawings, sculpture, and paintings sustain an uneasy state of mind, riding the line between the comic and the melancholic. Harrison’s sculpture “Before You Have To” incorporates a hat gifted to the artist but is also perhaps a memorial to a time that lies ahead; Wright’s two monumental paintings have both a deep sense of sadness and a playful sexual undertone, signaling mourning and reawakening. The first of Wright’s many flower works, they were painted 1988-91, in homage to the artist’s partner who had recently died of AIDS. In four modestly sized ink drawings, Oehlen also manages to subsume several moods into a single complex space, his creature-like trees ranging from ominous to brooding to gleeful. [READ MORE]


ATLBNL-ATLBNL-Joni-Mabe-5-755x1024.jpg

AARON SKOLNICK

ATLANTA BIENNIAL

Every year, more cities mount biennials. Over a century of variations on a similar theme, and the purpose of this recurring model remains unclear—beyond, perhaps, attracting cultural tourism, and in some cases fueling the fires of nationalism or regional identity. These exhibitions are known to elevate the visibility of emerging and mid-career artists, but as a curatorial format, the biennial rarely yields stronger results than any other group exhibition. Nonetheless, the number of biennials, triennials, and quinquennials worldwide now hovers around three hundred, having reached only fifty prior to the 1990s.[READ MORE]


picksimg00_430x.jpg

AMIR GUBERSTEIN

ART FORUM

Interested in the “choreography that comes out of the prohibition of movement,” Israeli-born Amir Guberstein assembles a body of nine new paintings for “Lamentations,” his first solo show in New York. Guberstein’s 2017 exhibition at New York’s American Jewish Historical Society was canceled due to censorship, courtesy of right-wing Judaism: His pieces incorporate black and white gesso mixed with sand from Israel and Palestine, which is then pushed through a silk screen. Of course, the artist collects the sand himself. This is a crossing, but to some, it’s considered a transgression.

In his work, Guberstein, like Anselm Kiefer and Cy Twombly, appropriates phrases from literary sources. For the suite of paintings here, the artist turned to The Book of Lamentations, found in the Torah and the Old Testament, which tells the story of the fall of Jerusalem in 586 BCE. Guberstein’s choice transcriptions (“O daughter Zion!”), alongside his use of sand, go beyond a singular “city lament,” as the Judeo-Christian tradition of poetic elegy for lost or fallen cities would have it, and instead mourn two different versions of the same city, fought over by fractious states.[READ MORE]


img_2942(2).jpeg

CRISTINE BRACHE

LOCUST PROJECTS

Often unapologetic, diaristic, and placing the viewer in the position of the voyeur, Cristine Brache’s work ambiguously deals with identity, power dynamics, and templates of the female body and psyche in relation to public and private space. Born in Miami to Cuban and Puerto Rican parents, Brache's installation at Locust Projects is inspired by her childhood home and brings a hyperreal version of its front yard into the gallery. Exploring boundaries of private and public space in relation to womanhood, the exhibition centers around porcelain shrines of the maternal figures in the artist's life. Informed by Santeria shrines the artist saw as a child adorning lawns in her neighborhood, Brache uses Santeria's codification of Orishas and their attributes as a template for humanizing and preserving the central figures in her life, celebrating their many facets. In its totality, the artist says the exhibition is a “syncretized constellation of my personal experience, a diary of sorts, that adopts a unique facet of Miami’s cultural landscape in form.” [READ MORE]


Hustler_1975_30x22_Graphite.jpg

JIMMY WRIGHT

M+B

M+B is proud to present a career spanning exhibition of paintings and works on paper by artist Jimmy Wright, his first solo exhibition at the gallery. The exhibition runs from February 16 through March 30, 2019, with an opening reception on Saturday, February 16 from 6 to 9 pm. 

Jimmy Wright, born in 1944, is a Kentucky native. He earned a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1967. Upon graduation, he received the George D. Brown Travel Fellowship, which enabled him to study and travel in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Wright earned an MFA from Southern Illinois University in 1971. His work hangs in many public and private collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. His work was recently on view at Cooper Cole, Toronto, in a group exhibition curated by Ashton Cooper titled “Terribly Vulnerable and Terribly Hard,” Lesley Heller Workspace, NYC; Brattleboro Museum, VT; Nassau County Museum of Art, NY; Chang Kai Shek Memorial Hall, Taipei, Taiwan and Hang MingShu Museum, Suzhou, P. R. China. His book, Jimmy Wright New York Underground 1973-90, was released by DAP. [READ MORE]


IMG_6663.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE AND BRAD PHILLIPS, EPITHALAMIUM

ANAT EGBI

Anat Ebgi is pleased to present Epithalamium, a two-person show with Cristine Brache and Brad Phillips, organized by Blair and Eli Hansen. The exhibition will be on view at AE2, January 26 through March 9th, with an opening reception on January 26, 6-8pm.

Taking its name from the epithalamium, a poem written for a bride, Cristine Brache and Brad Phillips, wife and husband artists, examine the potential of marriage, allowing their lived experience to speak to larger narratives of bodily trauma and mortality, while alluding to the intimate qualities of a unique partnership. [READ MORE]


_sketches047.jpg

AARON SKOLNICK

2019 ATLANTA BIENNAL

Since its inception in 1985 the Atlanta Biennial has been an important platform for contemporary art from our region. The exhibition aims to address complexities and deep vernacular traditions of the Southeast. This exhibition continues the longstanding efforts of Atlanta Contemporary to present and debut newly commissioned work by artists from around our region. For the 2019 Atlanta Biennial, the curators will conduct studio visits in 10 states – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee – and will look high and low, over, under, and in-between to celebrate the most compelling, creative voices working around us today. [READ MORE]


sketches031-442x600.jpg

AARON SKOLNICK

BURNAWAY

In the weeks following the opening of his first solo exhibition in New York, I interviewed Kentucky-based artist Aaron Skolnick (b. 1989, Erlander, Kentucky) about the body of work featured in “A Landscape that I know,” on view at Fierman Gallery on the Lower East Side through January 13. The exhibition is comprised of graphite self-portraits and portraits of the artist’s late husband, artist Louis Zoellar Bickett II (1950 – 2017), that Skolnick made during the last month of his husband’s life as Bickett succumbed to the incurable neurodegenerative disease ALS. [READ MORE]


unnamed.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

MECA

A retrospective of the five Puerto Rican Miss Universe winners through the lens of Miami artist Cristine Brache will represent Fierman, a New York gallery. Gender politics and power are considered through vanity-style conceptual portraits – porcelain mirrors, individual sculptures, congratulatory flowers and ribbons – installed on-site, in addition to a zine, Fucking Attention, in which Brache used a mathematical algorithm to combine images of titleholders with news articles about Trump’s tenure as the pageant’s president and, later, his treatment of Puerto Rico post-Maria. [READ MORE]


the_fiction_of_zero.jpg

JENEEN FREI NJOOTLI

NATIONAL GALLERY FOR SOBEY ART PRIZE


“When did your art practice begin to resemble what it is now?” The question – an icebreaker intended to get interview subjects comfortable talking about themselves – generally elicits a rundown of degree programs, exhibitions and milestone projects. Not with Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation artist Jeneen Frei Njootli, however, who shoulders the question by its foundation instead. The Whitehorse-born, Vancouver-based artist is representing the West Coast and Yukon as a finalist for the 2018 Sobey Art Award and her work is on view in the Sobey Art Award Exhibition opening this week at the National Gallery of Canada. [READ MORE]


Nester+24+x+32+inches.jpg

MATTHEW KIRK

PRELUDE PROJECTS
OBJECT // TOTEM
Eny Lee Parker, Hollister Hovey, Derrick Velasquez + Matthew Kirk
10.12.18 - 10.21.18


img_2447-kopio.jpg

MATTHEW KIRK

MAKASIINI CONTEMPORARY
LOTS OF BACK AND FORTH, 2018
Mixed media on Sheetrock
91 x 122 cm / 36 x 48 inches 


BRACHE_POEMS.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

POEMS is the debut poetry collection from artist and writer Cristine Brache, written between 2008-2018. Unapologetic and placing the reader in the position of the voyeur, Brache’s poems ambiguously deal with identity, power dynamics, and templates of the female body and psyche. Read an interview with Cristine Brache here. Book release 11/01/2018


wright-275x375.jpg

JIMMY WRIGHT

GREENSPON GALLERY

June 28 to August 3, 2018
71 Morton Street, between Greenwich and Hudson streets, New York City

The eroticism in the light-saturated scenes of Eilshemius and Klossowski tends towards the furtive; not so the rampant action in the darkened cellars of Jimmy Wright’s graphite drawings of 1970s leather bars, with their tough, gritty evocations of rough trade in dark corners. The artist known for most of his career for exuberant, expressionist flower paintings worked (and it would seem played) underground in the pre-AIDS New York he discovered on moving via Chicago from his native Kentucky. Legendary clubs like the Anvil brought out a combination of Francis Bacon interiors and Henry Moore shelter drawings to produce something at once mythic and visceral. His figuration is equal parts Leon Golub and Tom of Finland. A more tender touch – from artist and lovers alike – emerges from the bathhouse drawings, especially an exquisite drawing in watercolor pencil of a guy feeding his partner poppers where hastily scribbly yet resolved hieratic heads, very redolent of early Hockney, dissipate into fey and stylized lower limbs in a way that mimics, perhaps, the clarifying rush and melting away effects of the narcotic. The overt sexuality of Wright’s youthful drawings ought to send us back to his flowers to look for a second subject, the equivalents of buff he-men and writhing limbs amidst the tendrils and petals. [READ MORE]


unnamed.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

EMBAJADA

EMBAJADA in Partnership with Artist Alliance Inc. (AAI) and Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Center (The Clemente) 
107 Suffolk St, Room #406, NYC
July–December, 2018

Cristine Brache
October 28th 2018 - November 28, 2018

For her residency, Cristine Brache will create a series of portrait studies of her grandmother, Juliana, in an effort to redress the systemic cultural erasure often experienced generationally by diasporas. This body of work serves to identify and place cultural characteristics specific to the Caribbean in contemporary art discourse.

Cristine Brache (b.1984, Miami) is an artist and writer of Puerto Rican and Cuban descent living and working in Toronto. She holds an MFA in Fine Art Media from the Slade School of Fine Art (London, UK). Recent exhibitions include FIERMAN, New York; Team Gallery, New York; MOCA, Miami; Bow Arts, London; The Museum of the Moving Image, New York; Collectif Jeune Cinéma, Paris; and Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover. Her poetry has been published in Publishing Genius, New York Tyrant, Fanzine, Apogee, and E Ratio Postmodern Poetry Journal, among others. Writing about her work has appeared in The New Yorker, and Cordite Poetry Review. [READ MORE]

 


merlin_141365988_113d400c-d257-40f1-a635-8f4743f8841f-jumbo.jpg

DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE

THE NEW YORK TIMES

When the artist who currently goes by Dapper Bruce Lafitte returned to his native New Orleans a year after being displaced by Hurricane Katrina, he started making drawings of his parade-mad city’s high-school marching bands. Starting with schools that had been closed by the storm and working from memory, he initiated both his own artistic practice, which has subsequently blossomed in all sorts of directions, and an open-ended document of New Orleans folk history. The drawings, part of his new show, “The Culture,” at David Fierman, evoke notes made by a careful court herald. The figures are thorough, but rudimentary, while the colors, applied with marker, are vivid and precise. In two pieces from 2014, the Alabama State University band wears yellow and black and the Leopards of the Lake Area New Tech Early College High School wear red and blue. All of them play gleaming brass.

The key to the drawings’ magic is the orderly arrangement marching bands take in real life. This lets the artist, formerly known as Bruce Davenport Jr., picture them, and lets us see them, in two ways at once: in a flat grid, with all the feelings of completion and control provided by a well-designed diagram, and at an angled, bird’s-eye view that suggests a larger, more complex vista to explore.

For this show, he has also used work by fellow New Orleans artists to fill the gallery with some of that expanded context. Color photos by Moriah Blue give a sense of the Crescent City’s sensory overload, and the intricate beadwork and comic-book imagery of Torrence Batiste’s pink “Mardi Gras Indian” costume its unique aesthetic dedication. Brian Guidry’s burlap clothing — made from discarded coffee sacks that he collected while working on the docks, and nodding to both the history of slavery and haute couture — is weirdly unforgettable. WILL HEINRICH [READ MORE]


The-Loft (2).jpeg

JIMMY WRIGHT

THE SEAM, THE FAULT, THE FLAW

the Seam, the Fault, the Flaw draws on Roland Barthes’ 1973 work The Pleasure of the Text, in which he argues for text that is as powerful, unpredictable, and textured as the human body, which should be consumed to the point of orgasmic bliss. The radically subjective reader is anyone, from “whatever class, whatever group he may belong, without respect to cultures or languages…” Barthes notes that the “consequences” from such a union “would be huge, perhaps even harrowing,” an acknowledgement that binds the sensual to the political. In this state of bliss, what he refers to as jouissance, reader and text are cut loose from the social and political ideologies structured by and enacted through language. [READ MORE]


S2Y57XTPXVF5PG36T54NAUYHEA.jpg

KELLY JAZVAC

THE GLOBE AND MAIL

When you make a project of collecting scrap plastic, it’s not long before you’re drowning in the stuff; if you look for waste, artist Kelly Jazvac knows, you find it everywhere. 

For the past nine years, the Montreal-based sculptor has piled her studio with vinyl offcuts and errors, deinstalled billboards and used-up banners. Preparing Lamina Stamina, a solo exhibition at Museum London, she wants to communicate the size of that stash, so she’s applied swatches of the salvaged vinyl around the baseboards of a large gallery space, arranged chromatically like a colour wheel. Plastic waste is so plentiful, the display suggests, it comes in all shades of the rainbow. 

Heading off material destined for the landfill, Jazvac repositions it as objects that deserve not mindless consumption, but close consideration. Her artwork asks: What does disposability really entail? Nothing disappears just because it left us in a blue bin or a trash bag or a dumpster. In sculpture and film, she visualizes the ubiquity of plastic pollution, observable at every scale – from sheets of PVC broad enough to dress a skyscraper to particle-sized microplastics in Lake Ontario. She approaches the issue with the rigour and care of a scientist. She works with them regularly. When their fields are often divorced, she says that to solve this mess, it’s going to take collaboration between disciplines. She wants more voices engaged in the same conversation. It’s a leitmotif of the exhibition. [READ MORE]


Cast-of-Characters-image-final-500.jpg

DIETMAR BUSSE

CAST OF CHARACTERS

JUNE 14th, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 16TH, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION - THURSDAY, JUNE 15th, 2018

The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division and The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center are proud to present Cast of Characters, a dramatic transformation of the Bureau by artist Liz Collins featuring a salon-style exhibition of portraits by 95 LGBTQ artistsCast of Characters will be the Bureau’s most ambitious exhibition to date. We are thrilled to partner with Liz Collins on this exciting exhibition, but we need your help to help us fully realize her vision. [READ MORE]

 


unnamed.jpg

JENEEN FREI NJOOTLI

The Sobey Art Foundation and the National Gallery of Canada are pleased to present the five finalists for the 2018 Sobey Art Award, Canada’s prestigious contemporary art prize that recognizes and supports emerging artists from across the country. [READ MORE]

 


unnamed.jpg

CRISTINE BRACHE

THE LITTLE BABY SHOW

OPENING - FRIDAY, JUNE 1st 2018, 7-10

This show explores contemporary motherhood in regards to possession, religion, domination, and cuteness.

A portion of sales goes to the Trust Women Foundation in Wichita, Kansas.

[READ MORE]


Jazvac_leisure.jpg

KELLY JAZVAC

LAMINA STAMINA AT THE MUSEUM LONDON

May 15th, 2018 - September 9th, 2018

For more than a decade, London artist (now Montreal-based) Kelly Jazvac has created innovative art from the vinyl offcuts and other refuse of commercial sign makers. Lamina Stamina brings together an array of her diverse, often experimental pieces, including the recent Museum London acquisition Battle of Leisure (2013)—shown here for the first time—alongside a site-specific work produced from her stockpile of plastic detritus.

Jazvac develops unconventional objects and two-dimensional pieces that press against walls, linger across floors, and feature soft layers and bubbled skins. These works can be seen as contemporary contributions to the history of Canadian abstraction; some mimic living organisms, and others remain resolutely alternative creations .. [READ MORE]


unnamed.gif

MATTHEW KIRK

MATTHEW KIRK X ERICKSON ÆSTHETICS
CHAIRS 

Opening Party, Friday April 18th, 2018

6PM - 10PM 219 MADISON STREET

FIERMAN X Constance present MATTHEW KIRK X ERICKSON ÆSTHETICS: CHAIRS, a suite of collaborative unique chairs as well as paintings and design objects by Kirk and Erickson.  The show will open with a party on Friday April 13 from 6-10 PM and remain on view Saturday- Sunday April 14-15 and Friday - Sunday April 20-22 from 12 to 6 or by appointment.   Matthew Kirk's solo show 1978 is concurrently on view at FIERMAN through April 29.   

Constance is located at 219 Madison Street and is the new venture of Nathan Gwynne and Carlos Rigau. 

Matthew Kirk (b. 1978, Ganado, AZ) lives and works in Queens, NY.  A self-taught artist, he has recently had exhibitions at Adams and Ollman, Portland; Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago; Louis B. James, NY; Exit Art, New York.  His work has been published in The New York Observer, Modern Painters, and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications. 

Ben Erickson (b. 1978, Rutland, VT), lives and works in Brooklyn.  His work has been featured in Architectural Digest, T Magazine, Luxe, and Interior Design, among other publications. ERICKSON ÆSTHETICS is currently shown by Maison Gerard, New York; Colony Gallery, New York; Not So General, Los Angeles; Modern Living Supplies, New York; and Cooler Gallery, Brooklyn, among other venues.  


Wright-Roses_Earth-1993.jpg

JIMMY WRIGHT

COOPER COLE is pleased to present Terribly Vulnerable and Terribly Hard, a group exhibition curated by Ashton Cooper.

In James Baldwin’s 1956 novel Giovanni’s Room, the ill-fated lovers David and Giovanni first meet in a fictional Parisian gay bar that serves as a major setting in the book. Among the bar’s regulars are “the usual, knife-blade lean, tight trousered boys” who Baldwin describes as having “something behind their eyes at once terribly vulnerable and terribly hard.”  In considering these policed and unacceptable bodies, Baldwin employs a complex characterization that complicates a straightforward understanding of vulnerability. In intertwining vulnerability with hardness, he allows each term to exceed their oppositional meanings. Their hardness is fragile; their vulnerability is tough. [READ MORE]

 


DSC04796-2.jpg

unnamed.png

CRISTINE BRACHE

Essex Flowers is pleased to present a new digital commission by Cristine Brache. Personal Effects presents a selection of private letters written by three preteens in the mid-nineties, given to Cristine Brache by her friend, Honey Bee, the original owner who received them. [READ MORE]


unnamed.jpg

DIETMAR BUSSE

Book Launch & Artist Talk
Sunday, February 26th, 4:00 - 6:00

Artist Talk with Jane Ursula Harris at 4:30


Fierman_5157.jpg

DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE


EXHIBITION AT GALERIE TATJANA PIETERS, GHENT - Opening, March 18th, 2018


KELLY JAZVAC

Desk Set
CAC BRÉTIGNY - February 10th, 2018 - April 28th, 2018

22kjazvac2013Plastiglomerate2.jpeg

scott-covert-silver-warhol-factory-i__99576.1518538717.jpg

SCOTT COVERT

The Dead Supreme
Skidmore Contemporary Art - Opening, February 17th, 2018

 


CRISTINE BRACHE

'in her eye you see another small eye' at  - Opening, February 17th, 2018

unnamed.png

unnamed (3).jpg

unnamed (1).jpg

 

FIERMAN X SITUATIONS IN

BOMB MAGAZINE

situations-gallery.jpg

 

 

 

2017 continued the unfortunate economic and social impact of gallery spaces closing, including the universally beloved Murray Guy in Chelsea and On Stellar Rays—downsizing to Stellar Projects—on the Lower East Side (as one artist said to me, upon hearing news of both closures, “Can’t thirty other galleries shut down so that we can keep those two open?!”). And while the arts community has felt the loss of these and others, two spaces opened side by side in Chinatown at the end of 2016 and proved to operate within a sustainable (small yet vital) scale: Situations and Fierman. [READ MORE]


SCOTT COVERT IN

RAVELIN MAGAZINE

scott_covert_a-1600x1170-c-default.jpg

Under the long, obnoxious shadow that 250 South Street — the new 5,000 million story condo going up next to the Manhattan Bridge — casts on Henry street, I stopped by Situations, the brilliantly scrappy storefront gallery for a look at the Scott Covert show. Just as the gallery lies in the shadow of final-phase gentrification, Covert deals with that most permanent of shadows: death. [READ MORE]


SCOTT COVERT IN

NEW YORKER MAGAZINE

2017_11_13.jpg

In the zine accompanying this two-gallery show, there’s a telling photo of a minivan, its back door open to reveal stacked, rolled-up canvases. Covert, a figure of New York’s fabled downtown scene (whose work also appears in MOMA’s “Club 57” exhibition), has spent several decades creating paintings from gravestone rubbings, a technique that takes him on cross-country pilgrimages. Surprisingly, the results are anything but macabre. One glittery white work features the name and short life span of the Warhol superstar Candy Darling, floating above a rubbing of Marilyn Monroe’s grave, as if uniting the performers in Heaven. A deep-blue monochrome pairs the frenemies Joan Crawford and Bette Davis. [READ MORE]


picksimg_splash.jpg

SCOTT COVERT IN

ARTFORUM

Death pairs well with glamour: Think of Marlene Dietrich’s prostitute-spy character in Dishonored (1931), as she applies her lipstick before meeting a firing squad; Bette Davis as terminally ill socialite Judith Traherne in Dark Victory (1939); or Divine’s punk murderess Dawn Davenport in John Waters’sFemale Trouble (1974), where the actor soliloquizes from an electric chair like a demented starlet accepting her first, and final, Oscar.

[READ MORE]


JIMMY WRIGHT IN

JIMMY WRIGHT AND JOHN CORBETT IN CONVERSATION

9780997499520.jpg

Jimmy Wright in conversation with John Corbett at the book launch for Wright's Bathhouse, Meatpacking District and the Dream Cards: New York Underground 1973 - 1990.

Thursday, November 16th 2017 - 7:00pm

[READ MORE]


SCOTT COVERT IN

CLUB 57: FILM PERFORMANCE AND ART IN THE EAST VILLAGE, 1978-1983

Museum of Modern Art
11 W 53rd Street, New York, NY
October 31 - April 1

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the global public’s imagination. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake.


Image 9-25-17 at 8.23 PM.jpg

KELLY JAZVAC IN

PLASTIGLOMERATES BOOK LAUNCH

E-FLUX 311 EAST BROADWAY
October 7, 5-7PM

6PM Jazvac in conversation with Paige West, Claire Tow Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College

Kelly Jazvac Plastiglomerates published by Durable Goods, Toronto


CHUCK NANNEY IN

1107 MANHATTAN AVE PT.II

SPENCER BROWNSTONE
10 SEPTEMBER – 29 OCTOBER, 2017


DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

KINGPIN OF THE ANTPIN

NTUIT CENTER CHICAGO
OCTOBER 12-DECEMBER 10, 2017
OPENING FRIDAY OCT 13


CHUCK NANNEY IN

Selected Ambient Works, Volume II

MOCA TUCSON
17 JUNE - 1 OCTOBER 2017

Chuck Nanney will exhibit sculptural works made over the last three years, along with sound pieces, comprising a mini-retrospective of recent activity. Frequently protruding from the walls, painted vividly, and installed at various heights, the works have a Calder-like ability to playfully conflate stability and mobility. Intermixing minimalist tendencies with a distinctive rough-hewn quality, their brightness and seeming joviality are complimented and belied by a devotional quality that speaks eloquently of survival. Sound pieces composed of cut-up poetry and experimental pulsing pop melded with airy drones will accompany the visual display. 


THE DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

NEW HORIZONS:
SELF-TAUGHT ART IN THE 21ST CENTURY

SHUFORD GALLERY
September 23, 2017 – January 7, 2018


THE DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

R.I.P. Bruce A. Davenport, Jr. | Artwork by Dapper Bruce Lafitte

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY
August 5 – September 23, 2017

 


DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

ARTISTS STUDIOS

APRIL 22, 2017

 


DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

HYPERALLERGIC

APRIL 21, 2017

Drawing on Firsthand Experience to Depict the Horrors of Hurricane Katrina: Dapper Bruce Lafitte’s work records a singular personal trajectory in a grander, historically significant moment. [READ MORE]


DAPPER BRUCE LAFITTE IN

HARPERS

APRIL 2017


CRISTINE BRACHE IN

THE EDITORIAL MAGAZINE

MARCH 6, 2017

Cristine Brache’s new show I Love Me, I Love Me Not, uses sculpture and video as self-portraiture to confront a complicated relationship to the self, identity and history. As a child of immigrant parents from both Cuba and Puerto Rico, Brache describes her experience as a type of “cultural amnesia.” [READ MORE] 


JIMMY WRIGHT IN

ARTREVIEW

MARCH 2017
Ashton Cooper

For those of you looking to assuage the woes of shuttering gay bars and queer assimilation, Jimmy Wirght’s 11 glowing drawings at Fierman are something of a salve. Made between 1974 and 1976, they capture the then-thirty-year-old artist’s firsthand experiences of pre-AIDS New York nightlife at Club 82, the Anvil, Club Baths and Max’s Kansas City, among others. [READ MORE]


CRISTINE BRACHE IN

THE NEW YORKER

MARCH 6, 2017

In this deceptively demure show, the Toronto-based artist reflects on her identity as the Miami-born daughter of parents from Cuba and Puerto Rico, and finds it full of contradictions. A video begins with found fetish porn in which a woman eats insects and ends with Brache’s grandfather telling her that a woman without makeup is like a beautiful house whose garden has gone to waste. Delicate ceramic works—a dunce cap on a stool, a wall clock with no hands—evoke fragility. A curly-maple table displays porcelain playing cards, each one a Queen of Hearts featuring the artist’s profile.


KATHE BURKHART IN

FAST FORWARD: PAINTING FROM THE 1980S

JAN 27–MAY 14, 2017
WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Fast Forward: Painting from the 1980s presents a focused look at painting from this decade with works drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection. 
[LEARN MORE]


JIMMY WRIGHT IN

ARTFORUM
FEBRUARY 2017

Johanna Fateman

Painter Jimmy Wright’s “New York Underground,” a collection of voluptuous, ebullient, and funny works on paper between 1974 and 1976, felt especially appropriate to the charming, bare-bones venue, as his casually explicit depictions of gay nightlife—cruising, public sex, and socializing in clubs, bathrooms, and bathhouses, speak to a bygone era of downtown subculture. “This is the world of the Weimar Republic,” the artist has said of the post-Stonewall, preAIDS moment he represents here. “Too rich visually not to record.” [READ MORE - PDF]


MATTHEW KIRK AT

FOUR A.M.

JANUARY 4 - 17, 2017
291 Grand Street in NYC


JIMMY WRIGHT IN

FILTHY DREAMS

Wright’s drawings wove sordid tales of nights at bathhouses, sex clubs and famous Downtown art hangouts. Wright takes viewers on a Crisco-drenched trip through the Anvil, dancing at Club 82 and people watching at Max’s Kansas City. [READ MORE]


JIMMY WRIGHT IN

ARTCRITICAL

Never trust a man who paints nothing but flowers: something else is going on, either in secret, in his past, or perhaps indeed hiding in plain sight in those beautiful damned flowers! With Jimmy Wright one wouldn’t be surprised if it turns out to be all three. [READ MORE]


KIRSTY ROBERTSON IN 

E-FLUX
Journal #78 - December 2016

Kelly Jazvac
Plastiglomerate

In 2012, geologist Patricia Corcoran and sculptor Kelly Jazvac travelled to Kamilo Beach, following a tip from oceanographer Charles Moore that the beach was covered in a plastic-sand conglomerate. Moore suspected nearby volcanoes were to blame. In fact, the plastic and beach detritus had been combined into a single substance by bonfires. Human action on the beach had created what Corcoran and Jazvac named “plastiglomerate,” a sand-and-plastic conglomerate.  [READ MORE]


JIMMY WRIGHT IN 

OLYMPIA
Carte Blanche to Karma

KARMA - Galerie Patrick Seguin
Paris, from Oct. 17 to Nov. 26, 2016
5 rue des Taillandiers F-75011 | Paris 

This exhibition is the latest in a series of annual shows at Galerie Patrick Seguin entitled Carte Blanche, for which international galleries are invited to organize exhibitions. The exhibition features works from 53 artists, including Rita Ackermann, Tauba Auerbach, Nathaniel Axel, Will Boone, Carol Bove, Joe Bradley, Mathew Cerletty, Matt Connors, William Copley, William Crawford, Robert Crumb, John Currin, Jay DeFeo, Carroll Dunham, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Peter Halley, Nolan Hendrickson, Dorothy Iannone, Ray Johnson, Allen Jones, Martin Kippenberger, Aidan Koch, Mike Kuchar, Lee Lozano, Sara Lucas, Calvin Marcus, Jackson Mac Low, Jimm Nutt, Steven Parrino, Nicolas Party, Pablo Picasso, Sigmar Polke, Ken Price, Seth Price, Walter Price, Richard Prince, Christina Ramberg, Ed Ruscha, Borna Sammak, Joan Semmel, Spencer Sweeney, Tom of Finland, Torey Thornton, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Andy Warhol, Andro Wekua, Michael Williams, Stanley Whitney, Jimmy Wright, Duane Zaloudek.